The ICS Department defines four levels of teaching load:  “regular load”, “half load”, “reduced load”, and “no load” for tenure track faculty.

(1) The “regular” teaching load is the default load that applies to all ICS and LIS program faculty who do not fall into any of the other three categories. The regular load in the ICS Department is 2 courses per semester, or 4 courses per year.

For ICS program faculty, this is usually accomplished by teaching two regular courses in one semester, followed by one regular course plus team teaching ICS 101 in the other semester. In semesters where ICS program faculty are teaching only one regular course, they will be automatically assigned to team teach ICS 101 as their other course.  If they prefer not to team-teach ICS 101, they can substitute an ICS 400 or 600 level course including ICS 491/691 but excluding ICS 499/699. Note that CIS and ICS Grad Chair duties include ICS 690 and CIS 702, which do not count toward their “regular” teaching load but rather toward their Grad Chair duties.

For LIS program faculty, the regular load consists of teaching 2 courses per semester.

For faculty teaching in both ICS and LIS programs, the regular load consists of one ICS course and one LIS course per semester.

(2) The “half” teaching load applies to the ICS Department Associate Chair and all Graduate Program Chairs (ICS, LIS, and CIS).

For ICS program faculty, half load consists of teaching three courses plus team teaching ICS 101 over four semesters rather than two semesters.   Practically speaking, this means that these faculty are typically assigned to one course per semester for three semesters, and assigned to team teach ICS 101 for the fourth semester.

For LIS program faculty, half load consists of teaching four courses over four semesters.

(3) The “reduced” teaching load applies to new ICS and LIS program faculty during their first year.  This load is one course per semester.

(4) The “no” teaching load applies to the ICS Department Chair. It is defined as no specific teaching load.

Last updated: October, 2010

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