Tony Dow, “Exploit Development”

Come see a circus act of exploit development! No PowerPoints, prepare for nonstop action packed demos!! Bring your evil thinking caps and ask lots of questions. The only way to write safer code is to understand how it could be exploited.

Here are some of the things we will cover:

* Fuzzing for bugs
* Buffer overflow development
* IDS & antivirus avoidance
* Password hash cracking
* Client side document exploit
* Cross site scripting
* Local & remote file inclusions
* Sql injection
* Windows fails aka features

The talk will be held at The Box Jelly (Inside Fishcake furniture store) at 307c Kamani Street, Honolulu, HI 96813 on May 22nd, starting at 7:00pm. Parking is available at Sports Authority (owned by the same land owner). There is also street parking around the neighborhood. The speaker is Tony Dow.

Google maps link with picture of front door: http://g.co/maps/qdx2k

Gamification Anatomy: What, Why, Who, and How

Gamification is becoming increasingly popular among start-ups as well as established industry leaders. It is an ancient concept that is receiving new attention with the rise of social networks and new media. Gamification can change the way we shop, exercise, donate, travel, educate and interact with everything around us. In this free public seminar sponsored by UH Outreach College, find out what is it exactly, why it matters, who is it for and how it works.

Offered through Outreach College’s Pacific New Media Program.

With: Emre Tuncbilek
Info: May 24 • Thu • 7:00-9:00pm • Yukiyoshi Room, Krauss Hall 012 • Free • Call 956-8244 for information.
Event ID: EV0012085L

Seminar: Vicraj Thomas: “GENI: Global Environment for Network Innovations”

Tuesday, April 10, 2012, 2pm, Kuykendall 201. GENI has the goal of becoming the world’s first laboratory environment for exploring future Internets at scale, promoting innovations in network science, security, technologies, services, and applications.

Abstract: The Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) is a suite of research infrastructure components rapidly taking shape in prototype form across the US. It is sponsored by the US National Science Foundation, with the goal of becoming the world’s first laboratory environment for exploring future Internets at scale, promoting innovations in network science, security, technologies, services, and applications.

GENI is starting to enable academic and industrial researchers perform a new class of experiments that tackle critically important issues in global communications networks:

  • Science issues―we cannot currently understand or predict the behavior of complex, large-scale networks;
  • Innovation issues―we face substantial barriers to at-scale experimentation with new architectures, services, and technologies;
  • Society issues―we increasingly rely on the Internet but are unsure that can trust its security, privacy or resilience.

GENI enables researchers to explore these issues by running large-scale, well-instrumented, end-to-end experiments engaging substantial numbers of real users. These experiments may be fully compatible with today’s Internet, variations or improvements on today’s Internet protocols, or indeed radically novel “clean slate” designs. The GENI project is paving the way to such experiments by a “mesoscale” build-out through more than a dozen US campuses, two national backbones, and several regional networks. Early successes with these build-outs are laying the foundation for a more substantial build-out with the goal of GENI-enabling 100–200 US campuses.

Bio: Dr. Vicraj (Vic) Thomas is a Scientific Director at BBN Technologies and a Systems Engineer with the GENI Project Office (GPO). His research interests lie in the areas of distributed and fault-tolerant systems. On the GENI project he is responsible for Distributed Services and Security. Prior to BBN, Vic was a Staff Scientist at Honeywell. He was the Industrial Technology Area Leader for the sensor networks research area within the US-UK International Technology Alliance (ITA) program on Network Science; the PI for Honeywell’s DARPA NEST and Ultra*Log projects; a systems architect on the NASA C3I network for the Orion program and a member of the architecture team for the Boeing Future Combat Systems SOSCOE system (middleware for the FCS system of systems). Vic has been invited to speak at workshops and conferences including the NSF/Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Workshop on Sensors, Smart Structures and Mechatronic Systems (Tokyo 2005), the EU Workshop on Next Generation Sensor Actuator Systems (Edinburgh 2007), the International Workshop on Cyber-Physical Systems Challenges and Applications (Santorini 2008), the International Symposium on Global Information Governance (Prague 2009) and Workshop on the Governance of Technology, Information, and Policies (Orlando 2011).

CIS Seminar: Carsten Sorensen, “Digital Innovation Challenges: Struggling with Paradoxes of Change and Control”

Monday, January 23, 2012 from 4:30-5:30 in Hamilton Library 3F. The technical process of digitizing analogue data into digital bit-streams and the associated socio-technical processes of digitalisation has yet to fully reveal their disruptive potentials – yet researchers and practitioners alike must comprehend these phenomena. Dr. Carsten Sørensen is a leading authority on mobile information technology innovation and has the past decade studied; enterprise mobility, mobile platforms, organisational information services, and digital infrastructure innovation.

Abstract: The technical process of digitizing analogue data into digital bit-streams and the associated socio-technical processes of digitalisation has yet to fully reveal their disruptive potentials – yet researchers and practitioners alike must comprehend these phenomena. Digitalization removes tight couplings between an informational object and associated technologies for storage, processing, and distribution. Vinyl records physically capture sound waves; the turntable enables the processing of the captured sound; and a global network of organisations manages the distribution of records. MP3 files, on the other hand; can be stored on a range of media; processed by turntables, iPods, mobile phones, and laptops; and are distributed in P2P networks, through the iTunes store, and by traditional retail distribution. While the first wave of digitalization merely trotted along previous paths and the music industry, for example, benefitting greatly financially from distributing digital music on CDs, subsequent radical innovations such as Napster, iPods, Last.fm, and Spotify, has shaken the power relationships between new and old organisations.

Digital innovation brings a number of research themes to the foreground and the aim of this talk is to discuss a couple of these themes as a way of stimulating the debate on how research can provide useful insights. Firstly, digitalization is at the core related to the development of, engagement with, and control over digital infrastructures. These can assume a variety of forms from semi-open platforms to open global infrastructures. The interrelationships between stakeholders must be understood in terms of paradoxical relationships of collaboration, mutual interdependencies and conflict – tussles. Digital infrastructures are essentially relational entities where development signals a paradoxical relationship between both stability and change, and between control and generativity. Change is facilitated by stability, which in turn hinders change. Digital infrastructures critically rely on control mechanisms and increasing control can both stimulate and dampen generativity. The talk will discuss issues of digital infrastructure change and -control through examples, and the presentation draws upon current research on mobile platform innovation conducted at LSE’s unit for the study of digital infrastructure innovation (digitalinfrastructures.org)

Dr Carsten Sørensen (www.carstensorensen.com) is a leading authority on mobile information technology innovation and has the past decade studied; enterprise mobility, mobile platforms, organisational information services, and digital infrastructure innovation. Carsten lectures Information Systems and Innovation in Department of Management at The London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom. He holds a BSc. in mathematics, an MSc in computer science and a Ph.D. in information systems from Aalborg University, Denmark. Carsten has since 1986 studied how ICT shapes and is shaped by emerging working practices and organizational forms. In 2001 he founded the mobility@lse (mobility.lse.ac.uk) research unit, which aims at drawing together academics with an interest in the profound changes to society, organisations and individuals from mobile, pervasive and ubiquitous information technology. He has since 2008 studied digital infrastructure innovation in large research projects. Carsten has international project experience from 1990 and extensive EU research project experience from 1992. He is a Senior Editor for The Information Systems Journal, and Associate Editor of Journal of the AIS and The e-Service Journal. Carsten is on the editorial board for Information and Organization and a member of the Advisory Board for Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems. He is an Academic Advisor for The Institute for Innovation & Information Productivity and a member of Future Foundation Global Network of Experts. Carsten also served as a member of the Advisory Board for the iSociety project at The Work Foundation. Carsten is actively engaged with executive education and has consulted for a range of organisations, for example; Microsoft, Google, Orange, PA Consulting Group, IMF, Steria, CSC, The Mobile Virtual Centre of Excellence, 3 UK, Skype, AXA, Carphone Warehouse, CA, and The Danish Ministry of Science – to name a few.