“Coping with untrusted or vulnerable cloud services”, Michael Freedman, Princeton University

Please join us for research presentation by Dr. Michael J. Freedman: “Coping with untrusted or vulnerable cloud services”, Wednesday, July 2nd, POST 302.

Abstract:

Today, we protect our computing infrastructure by building thicker digital walls or by using more aggressive auditing to diagnose data leakage. Yet, the ongoing centralization of services and information in large-scale data centers and cloud environments has only increased their value for targeted cyber attacks. For the last few years, my research group has been pursuing an alternative vision for system and network security: To what extent can we secure applications and data when the infrastructure itself may be actively malicious (due to insider attacks or successful break-ins)? Or, how might we greatly minimize the potential for data loss when application code may be vulnerable to external exploitation? In this talk, I present two related projects addressing these challenges.
First, my group has built systems that use a centralized cloud provider without trusting it with the privacy or integrity of users’ data. The provider’s servers see only encrypted data and cannot deviate from correct protocol execution without detection. The cloud servers primarily act as a storage and ordering service, with most application logic pushed to the client. We have applied these general methods to both group-collaboration applications (such as online word processing) and large-scale social-networking services, both of which support fine-grained, dynamic groups of users that operate on cryptographically-secured information.
Second, in many client-facing applications, a vulnerability in any part can compromise the entire application and gain access to all its data. I describe a new system, Passe, that protects a data store from unintended data leaks and unauthorized writes even in the face of application compromise. Passe automatically splits (previously shared-memory-space) web applications into sandboxed processes, and then restricts communication between those components and the types of accesses each component can make to shared storage, such as a backend database. To limit components to their least privilege, Passe applies dynamic analysis to learn data and control-flow relationships between data accesses, and then strongly enforces those relationships.

Links:

http://sns.cs.princeton.edu/projects/untrusted-cloud/

http://sns.cs.princeton.edu/projects/passe/

Short Bio:

Dr. Michael J. Freedman is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at Princeton University, with a research focus on distributed systems, networking, and security. Prior to joining Princeton in 2007, he received his Ph.D. in computer science from NYU’s Courant Institute and his S.B. and M.Eng. degrees from MIT. He developed and operates several self-managing systems — including CoralCDN, a decentralized content distribution network, and DONAR, a server resolution system powering the FCC’s Consumer Broadband Test — which serve millions of users daily. Other research has included software-defined and service-centric networking, cloud storage and data management, untrusted cloud services, fault-tolerant distributed systems, virtual world systems, peer-to-peer systems, and various privacy-enhancing and anti-censorship systems. Freedman’s work on IP geolocation and intelligence led him to co-found Illuminics Systems, which was acquired by Quova (now part of Neustar) in 2006. His work on programmable enterprise networking (Ethane) helped form the basis for the OpenFlow / software-defined networking architecture. Honors include a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), Sloan Fellowship, NSF CAREER Award, Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, and DARPA Computer Science Study Group membership.

Ph.D. Defense: “Kernel-based empirical bayesian classification method with applications to protein phosphorylation and non-coding RNA”, Mark Menor

Kernel-based empirical bayesian classification method with applications to protein phosphorylation and non-coding RNA

Mark Menor

 

Monday, June 2, 10:00am, POST 302

Abstract: With the advancement of high-throughput sequencing technologies, a new era of ‘big data’ biological research has dawned. However, the abundance of biological data presents many challenges in their analysis and it has proven very difficult to extract impor- tant information out of the data. One approach to this problem is to use the methods of machine learning.

In this dissertation, we describe novel probabilistic kernel-based learning methods and demonstrate their practical applicability by solving major bioinformatics problems at the transcriptome and proteome levels where the resulting tools are expected to help biologists further elucidate the important information contained in their data.

The proposed binary classification method, the Classification Relevance Units Machine (CRUM), employs the theory of kernel and empirical Bayesian methods to achieve non-linear classification and high generalization. We demonstrate the practical applicabil- ity of CRUM by applying it to the prediction of protein phosphorylation sites, which helps explain the mechanisms that control many biochemical processes.

Then we develop an extension of CRUM to solve multiclass problems, called the Multiclass Relevance Units Machine (McRUM). McRUM uses the error correcting output codes framework to decompose a multiclass problem into a set of binary problems. We devise a linear-time algorithm to aggregate the results into the final probabilistic multiclass prediction to allow for predictions in large scale applications. We demonstrate the practical applicability of the McRUM through a solution to the identification of mature microRNA (miRNA) and piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) in small RNA sequencing datasets. This provides biologists a tool to help discover novel miRNA and piRNA to further understand the molecular processes of the organisms they study.

Committee: Kyungim Baek (Chairperson), Guylaine Poisson (Chairperson), Henri Casanova, Scott Robertson, and Gernot Presting

Big Data comes to Manoa

IPRC’s Director Kevin Hamilton was featured together with Steven Smith (UH Interim Vice President for Information Technology) and David Chin (Chair of the UH Information and Computer Sciences Department) on an episode of Jay Fidell’s ThinkTech Hawaii show, which was devoted to “Big Data Comes to Manoa.” The panel discussed new initiatives to establish a University high-performance computing capability and data center. IPRC is projected to be one of the very heaviest users of the new facilities, and Hamilton described the possibilities for climate modeling that will be opened up. Click to watch video.

AT&T Mobile App Hackathon

The University of Hawai’i is proud to host the AT&T Mobile App Hackathon! This event is designed for UH students (technical & non-technical) to build mobile apps that run on either Android or iOS devices, get fed, compete for prizes across different categories and most importantly: meet new people and scout for teammates to work on new or current projects.

The event begins on Thursday, March 27, 2014 and runs through Saturday, March 29, 2014. It will be held at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa Information Technology Center, First Floor, Room 105 A/B. This event is open to all students of the University of Hawaii campuses.

For more information, see the website.

ICS sponsors ITS 2014

The Intelligent Tutoring Systems 2014 conference is the 12th of a regular bi-annual conference on the use of advanced computer technologies and interdisciplinary research for enabling, supporting or enhancing human learning. The conference will take place from 5 to 9 of June 2014 in Honolulu, Hawaii. It is expected that more than 250 academics, scientists and students from all over the world will attend.

This year’s conference theme is “Creating Fertile Soil for Learning Interactions”. With an emphasis not only on developing technologies to support learning, but on making fundamental discoveries regarding teaching and learning, ITS 2014 will bring together researchers from computer science, learning sciences, cognitive or educational psychology, sociology, cognitive science, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and linguistics. ICS faculty member Martha Crosby is general chair, and faculty members Dan Suthers and Michael-Brian Ogawa are on the program committee.

For more information, see the website.

New Faculty: Jason Leigh

The ICS Department is delighted to announce that Jason Leigh will be joining our Department in January, 2014. 

Leigh is currently a Professor of Computer Science and Director of the Electronic Visualization Lab (EVL) and Software Technologies Research Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he also holds an appointment in the Department of Communication.

“We have identified big data visualization as a critical area in which we need to grow capacity to support the Hawai‘i Innovation Initiative and UH’s own research aspirations,” said UH Interim President David Lassner. ”Jason is one of the best anywhere, with a proven track record of successful innovation and deep collaboration with leading scientists within his institution and around the world.”

Leigh’s SAGE (Scalable Adaptive Graphics Environment) software is the de facto standard for driving ultra-high resolution display walls around the world, which are fast becoming the lenses through which insight and innovation from big data science and engineering collaborations are brought into focus.

2013 Po’oihe Cyber Range Exercise

Building on the success of collegiate level cyber defense competitions and cyber defense exercises with the University of Hawaii, and the Department of Defense, we are producing the Po′oihe Cyber Defense Exercise, with events August 2nd-4th. The exercise is designed to bring practitioners in industry and government together with students to practice cybersecurity event response, mitigation, and strategy. By having practitioners from industry, government, and students from local colleges and universities we are able to foster a diverse team setting that helps promote communication, leadership, and relationships. This is increasingly important as every sector attempts to handle growing cybersecurity threats, the task of reporting events, and determining what resources are available from government agencies for additional help.

With the idea of helping protect local critical infrastructure from cyber threats, teams within the National Guard called “Computer Network Defender or (CND Team)” and Air Guard Hunter Groups have been created. The role of the 21st century minuteman now includes helping defend resources throughout the state for cyber threats through CND and Hunter Teams and they will be working alongside practitioners and infrastructure owners in this event.

By participating in a scenario game environment, participants reinforce practical skills and build relationships with other practitioners in their area. Participants for the Po′oihe Cyber Defense Exercise will be given a scenario of critical infrastructure in a business setting to defend as a “Blue Team” while other professionals from government, industry, and students from Universities Computing and Software Systems will attack the infrastructure as a “Red Team.” The goal of this exercise is to encourage proper Information Assurance and Cybersecurity practices and provide a learning forum for participants.

This will be a great event and we look forward to having your participation!

For more information, go to http://pooihecyberrange.wordpress.com/.  A Ka Leo article on the Cyber Range is available here.

Call for participation: the 2013 “Big Splash” CyberDefense Competition

Volunteers needed for the 2013 Big Splash Cyberdefense competition. The “Big Splash” is designed to bring practitioners in industry and government together with students to practice cybersecurity event response, mitigation, and strategy.

Building on the success of collegiate level cyber defense competitions and cyber defense exercises with the Washington Army National Guard; the University of Hawaii Manoa, the University of Washington Center for Information Assurance and Cybersecurity, UW Bothell CSS, and Nathcorp, are producing the “Big Splash” Cyber Defense Exercise, with events March 7th-10th. The “Big Splash” is designed to bring practitioners in industry and government together with students to practice cybersecurity event response, mitigation, and strategy. By having practitioners from industry, government, and students from local colleges and universities we are able to foster a diverse team setting that helps promote communication, leadership, and relationships. This is increasingly important as every sector attempts to handle growing cybersecurity threats, the task of reporting events, and determining what resources are available from government agencies for additional help.

With the idea of helping protect local critical infrastructure from cyber threats, teams within the National Guard called “Computer Network Defender or (CND Team)” have been created. The role of the 21st century minuteman now includes helping defend resources throughout the state for cyber threats through CND Teams and they will be working alongside practitioners and infrastructure owners in this event. Additional support for local critical infrastructure comes from the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Bureau of Investigation and several other federal agencies. DHS and FBI will be providing training to participants about how they can help respond to cybersecurity threats.

By participating in a scenario game environment, participants reinforce practical skills and build relationships with other practitioners in their area. Participants for the “Big Splash” will be given a scenario of critical infrastructure in a business setting to defend as a “Blue Team” while other professionals from government, industry, and students from University of Washington Bothell Computing and Software Systems will attack the infrastructure as a “Red Team.” The goal of this exercise is to encourage proper Information Assurance and Cybersecurity practices and provide a learning forum for participants.

For more information on how to participate, please see Gerald Lau (glau@hawaii.edu).

More details on the Big Splash are available here.

 
 

Boeing Information Session

Representatives from Boeing Information Systems will be hosting an information system at Marine Sciences Building 114 from 6:00-7:30pm on Tuesday October 9th. Food will be provided

From the Boeing flyer:

Internship and entry-level positions cover a variety of opportunities, which include programming, system analysis, IT project management, and Boeing’s IT rotation program. These positions will support Boeing systems, which enable core functions such as Engineering, Manufacturing, Supply Chain, Finance, and Human Resources. They also include responsibilities to develop and enhance systems that support Boeing Commercial Airplanes and Defense, Space & Security. Positions are available in Arlington, Philadelphia, Seattle, Southern California and St. Louis.

Intern Qualifications

To be considered for an internship position, you must apply no later than November 1, 2012. Internships begin May or June 2013 and last approximately 12 weeks. Eligible candidates should be pursuing a bachelor’s or master’s degree in an Engineering discipline or Computer Science major, scheduled to graduate after August 2012. GPA of 3.0 or better is required.

Information Technology Internship: Req # 12-1016840

Entry-Level Qualifications

To be considered for an entry-level position, you must apply no later than November 1, 2012. Positions begin in January, June, or July 2013. Eligible candidates should be pursuing a bachelor’s or master’s degree in an Engineering discipline or Computer Science major, scheduled to graduate by no later than June 2013. GPA of 3.0 or better is required.

Information Security Systems Design Specialist: Req # 12-1020591

Systems Engineer: Req # 12-1020452

Java Software Developer: Req # 12-1016064

Information Technology Career Foundation Program (ITCFP): Req # 12-1016841

Aloha Ruby Conference October 8, 2012

We have assembled a great cast of speakers from: AT&T Interactive, LivingSocial, GitHub, Heroku and Google. The conference will be a great opportunity to hear about some of the great new innovations and best practices emerging from the Ruby/Rails community. All knowledge levels are welcome to attend!

Join us for this 2 day event which brings the Ruby and Rails community’s top speakers and talent together with excited attendees.

We have assembled a great cast of speakers from: AT&T Interactive, LivingSocial, GitHub, Heroku and Google.  The conference will be a great opportunity to hear about some of the great new innovations and best practices emerging from the Ruby/Rails community.  All knowledge levels are welcome to attend!

To view the rest of the speaker lineup and purchase tickets, please go to:http://aloharubyconf.com

Note: UH Students can receive a $55 discount from the general price.