LAVA demonstrates satellite visualization at AMOS 16

The 17th Annual Advanced Maui Optical and Space Surveillance Technologies Conference was held on Sept. 20-23, 2016 at the Wailea Marriott Resort and Spa with a record-breaking attendance of over 680 participants.

Representing the  Laboratory for Advanced Visualization & Applications, two undergraduate students Ryan Theriot, who is studying Computer Science, and Andrew Guagliardo who is studying Animation with the Academy for Creative Media exhibited a program developed by Theriot called SatWatch at the conference.

SatWatch is a virtual reality exploration of satellite orbits around Earth. By pulling publicly available TLE (Two-Line element) data from the Celestrak website, SatWatch is able to create a predictive model of orbits for a wide variety of satellites. The TLE dataset is converted using the OrbitTools library. The entire program is built in the Unity game engine, a popular tool for developing interactive applications. For hardware, SatWatch utilizes the HTC Vive, which allows a user to interact with the virtual, 3d environment using motion tracking. This combination creates a natural way for users to explore the data in an immersive experience. SatWatch is an example of a complex dataset represented in an intuitive way, allowing users to easily understand satellite orbits in an interactive visualization environment.

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Town Hall Meeting between ICS Faculty and Students

Students

Students participating on the Town Hall meeting.

ICS faculty and students held a “town hall” meeting in ICSpace to discuss issues. Among the topics discussed were the “no repeat” policy for introductory classes, the “B-or-better” policy in introductory classes for majoring in ICS, the availability of writing intensive and oral intensive courses within ICS, class scheduling, and changes on the prerequisite structure.

Faulty members also introduced themselves to students and highlighted their research.

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Faculty participating in the Town Hall meeting.

Beyond issues of the curriculum, the most lively discussion ensued around the question of why a student should pursue a degree in computer science instead of some kind of technical certification from a programming bootcamp. This is a complex issue that deserves thought, and we were happy to explore it.

Oh, and there was pizza.

Many thanks to the students and faculty who participated. A special mahalo to the Academic Advising staff who also participated.

 

Counselors

Academic counselors participated in the Town Hall meeting.

 

Missed it?  We will be having regular meetings of this type as long as students keep showing up.

ICS Lunch and Seminar Series: Michael Goodrich

POST318B (ICSpace) Thursday September 8, 12:00pm
Pizza and beverages provided!

Invertible Bloom Lookup Tables and Their Applications to Data Analysis

Michael Goodrich, Ph.D.

Abstract:
We present a version of the Bloom filter data structure that supports not only the insertion, deletion, and lookup of key-value pairs, but also allows a complete listing of the pairs it contains with high probability, as long the number of key-value pairs is below a designed threshold. Our structure allows the number of key-value pairs to greatly exceed this threshold during normal operation. Exceeding the threshold simply temporarily prevents content listing and reduces the probability of a successful lookup. If entries are later deleted to return the structure below the threshold, everything again functions appropriately. We also show that simple variations of our structure are robust to certain standard errors, such as the deletion of a key without a corresponding insertion or the insertion of two distinct values for a key. The properties of our structure make it suitable for several applications, including database and networking applications that we highlight.

Bio:
Prof. Goodrich received his B.A. in Mathematics and Computer Science from Calvin College in 1983 and his PhD in Computer Sciences from Purdue University in 1987. He is a Chancellor’s Professor at the University of California, Irvine, where he has been a faculty member in the Department of Computer Science since 2001. Dr. Goodrich’s research is directed at the design of high performance algorithms and data structures with applications to information assurance and security, the Internet, machine learning, and geometric computing. With over 300 publications, including several widely-adopted books, his recent work includes contributions to efficient and secure distributed data structures, information privacy, social networks, and cloud security. He is an ACM Distinguished Scientist, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), a Fulbright Scholar, a Fellow of the IEEE, and a Fellow of the ACM. He is a recipient of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Achievement Award, the Brown Univ. Award for Technological Innovation, and the Pond Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

Grad Seminar Guest: Chris Zimmerman

Graduate seminar, Thursday, Sept. 8, 4:30-5:30, POST 126

Space vs. Place: Comparing Space-based Movements and Place-based Experiences while Exploring the Digital Reverberations of City Spaces and Public Places

Chris Zimmerman, Copenhagen Business School

Abstract  This research applies urban informatics methods and techniques on big data generated from the concentrated environment of the second largest music festival in the world, Roskilde Festival. First, we explain how to utilize relevant dimensions from human geography theories towards mapping a ‘Geography of Importance’. Second, we elaborate on methods deployed for collecting both mobile GPS and social media traces that the smart phone generates in physical spaces. Third, we compare and contrast the automatically geocoded presence in space and at events with the intentionally socially tagged consumption of these spaces and events as place-based experiences. In doing so, these two layers of space-based movements and place-based experiences reveal the appropriation of affordances and choices of aesthetic appreciation by the crowd at large of what is subjectively and relatively meaningful, actionable, and valuable.

First Disrupt Army Hackathon Coming Up

Disrupt Army Hackathon

The first of a series of Web Application Hackathons will be held on Sept. 30 – Oct. 1 at the Manoa Innovation Center.

All students (17+) are welcome to join. For your hacking efforts there will be food, drinks and prizes!

“@disruptarmy disrupts information systems by hosting hackathon events for students…”

More information: http://www.disruptarmy.com/

 

 

ACM Student Chapter hosts high school events

The UH ACM Student Chapter (ACManoa) hosted two outreach workshops in ICSpace (POST 318B) earlier this month. The workshops provided students from the UH Information and Computer Science (ICS) program with the opportunity to mentor high school students interested in programming. Members of ACManoa took the opportunity to give back to the community and foster interest in the ICS program at the University.

For more details, see this posting.

Governor David Ige Visits CyberCANOE

March 29, 2016

Governor David Ige and the first lady were treated to a 3D graphic display on the UH West Oʻahu CyberCANOE (Collaborative Analytics Navigation and Observation Environment) that is used to carry picture and sound between UH classrooms so students on different campuses may see each other and work together sharing rich media and information.

The CyberCANOE project is led by UH Manoa ICS professor Jason Leigh, of the Laboratory for Advanced Visualization and Applications, and funded by the National Science Foundation and the Academy for Creative Media System. ICS PhD student Dylan Kobayashi and Computer Engineering Master’s student, Noel Kawano delivered the demonstration by connecting the CyberCANOE in West Oahu to the ones in UH Manoa and UH Hilo’s ʻImiloa Astronomy Center.

The demonstration of the CyberCANOE was part of a tour of the UH West Oahu campus to get to know the university’s creative media programʻUluʻulu moving image archive and forensic anthropology program.

Addition details of the visit can be found here.

ICS and LAVA featured at March Wetware Wednesday

Wetware Wednesday, a monthly high tech networking event hosted by HTDC, will be hosted this month by the ICS Department and Jason Leigh’s LAVA laboratory.

Join us from 6-8pm on March 30 in Keller 102 for light refreshments, conversation, and the following five minute lightning talks by ICS faculty and students:

  • Dylan Kobayashi, Intro to LAVA Lab.
  • Jan Stelovsky, Flip-Flop: Learning by Teaching and PANTSEE: Programs Are Not Text Structured Editing Environment.
  • Philip Johnson, RadGrad: Developing awesome computer scientists, one graduate at a time.
  • Edo Biagioni, AllNet — ad-hoc networking for everyone.
  • Scott Robertson, ALL CAPS: Social media and public discourse.
  • David Chin, Your emails, Facebook posts, and/or blogs reveal your personality.
  • Dusko Pavlovic, Security Science (SecSci) beyond the hype
  • Edo Biagioni, The ICS Graduate Program for working professionals.

You can hear more about the event in ByteMarks Cafe Episode 395.

Seminar: Terence Parr, “Mini-tutorial on building ANTLR 4 grammars”

Programmers run into parsing problems all the time, whether it’s a data format like JSON, a network protocol like SMTP, a server configuration file for Apache, or a simple spreadsheet macro language. My goal with ANTLR 4 was to make it as easy as possible to build parsers and the language applications on top. ANTLR will accept all grammars (minor caveat: no indirect left-recursion) and can produce extremely efficient ALL(*), Adaptive LL(*), parsers. In this talk, I’ll give a mini-tutorial on ANTLR 4 and the Intellij plugin.

Thursday, March 17th, 4:30pm-5:30pm in POST 126

Bio: Terence Parr is a professor of computer science at the University of San Francisco where he continues to work on his ANTLR parser generator. Until January 2014, Terence was the graduate program director for computer science and was the founding director of the MS in Analytics program. Before entering academia in 2003, he worked in industry and co-founded jGuru.com. Terence herded programmers and implemented the large jGuru developers website, during which time he developed and refined the StringTemplate engine. Terence has consulted for and held various technical positions at companies such as Google, IBM, Lockheed Missiles and Space, NeXT, and Renault Automation. Terence holds a Ph.D. in Computer Engineering from Purdue University.

AT&T Hackathon, Friday, March 11

The 2016 AT&T mobile hackathon is coming up this Friday, March 11, 2016. It is designed for attendees interested in coding mobile apps or hacking hardware solutions. So join us as we hack hardware, build apps/mobile apps, get fed, compete for prizes across different categories and most importantly: meet new people and scout for teammates to work on new or current projects. We will have experts from AT&T and the local community onsite to assist with your development.

For more information, see the hackathon signup page.

You can also watch this news story on KITV featuring Professor David Chin and student Micah Mynatt.