LAVA exhibits at the Cultural Animation Film Festival 2017

Academy for Creative Media students (Kari Noe, Andrew Guagliardo, Kurt Noe), ICS student (Anna Sikkink), and Learning Technology students (Patrick Karjala, Dean Lodes) demonstrated two virtual reality projects (Kilo Hoku and How Maui Snared the Sun) at the 2017 Cultural Animation Film Festival at the Honolulu Museum of Art

Kilo Hoku is a project to explore the possibility of teaching future generations of students in the art and science of polynesian way finding using VR technology. The simulation puts the user on-board a virtual Hokulea twin-hull polynesian voyaging canoe and teaches them how to navigate between two nearby islands in Hawaii. The work was developed by ACM, ICS double major Kari Noe, ICS student Anna Sikkink, Learning Technology students Patrick Karjala and Dean Lodes.

How Maui Snared the Sun is a VR telling of the well known Polynesian myth of how Maui slowed down the sun in order to give the world more daylight. The work was developed by double ICS and ACM major Andrew Guagliardo, and ICS
major Anna Sikkink.

The projects were created as part of the ICS department’s Virtual and Augmented Reality course taught by Professor Jason Leigh, Director of the Laboratory for Advanced Visualization and Applications (LAVA). Hardware and software for the show was co-sponsored by LAVA, the Academy for Creative Media System, and University of Hawaii’s Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program.

 

March for Science Hawaii Set for April 22

The Information and Computer Sciences Department is a proud endorser of the March for Science in Hawaii.

The nationwide March for Science is the first step of a global movement to defend the vital role science plays in our health, safety, economies, and governments. Marches will take place in cities across the country on Earth Day, April 22, 2017.

The Honolulu event will start at 3 p.m. at the UH Manoa campus. There will be speakers, entertainment and activities before the March. The march will commence at 4 p.m. from Dole and University Streets.

More information:

There is no Planet B.

Kari Noe Demonstrates Virtual Reality at Math Day in Molokaʻi

Molokaʻi Math Day took place on April 8, 2017 in conjunction with the Hoʻomau festival at Lanikeha, Hoolehua on Molokaʻi. Molokaʻi Math Day was initiated in 2011 by the department of Mathematics and has become a yearly event since then. On April 8th, two UH faculty, two post-doctoral researchers, three graduate students and seven undergraduate students flew to Molokaʻi to run activities including robotics, toothpick geometry, origami 3D-shapes and probability games.

This year, Kari Noe of the Laboratory for Advanced Visualization and Applications participated with a portable VR station displayed for the first time, it proved to be a resounding success among Molokaʻi’s population with students lining up to dive into their first encounter with the world of virtual reality.

Kari is an undergraduate double major in Information & Computer Science and Academy for Creative Media (ACM). Kari also works as a laboratory research assistant in LAVA funded by ACM System.

Dr. Kim Binsted Talks Mars at The President’s Series on Hawai‘i Island

What Will It Be Like to Live on Mars?
Planning for Human Exploration of Space

On April 5, ICS Professor Kim Binsted will discuss the HI-SEAS (Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) project as part of The President’s Series on Hawai‘i Island.

 

HI-SEAS is an analog habitat for human spaceflight to Mars, located on an isolated Mars-like site on the Mauna Loa side of the saddle area at 8200 feet above sea level. The fourth phase of the project began in August of 2015 and lasted for one year. Learn what was discovered about what humans will need to stay happy and healthy during an extended mission to Mars.

Wednesday, April 5, 5 p.m.
RSVP by March 30
808-956-9340 or events@uhfoundation.org

Location
Hawaiʻi Community College – Pālamanui Outdoor Theatre (Campus Piko)
73-4225 Ane Keohokālole Hwy, Kailua-Kona

More information: The President’s Series – Hawai‘i Island

 

ICS Lunch and Seminar Series: John Iacono on 3/16

Thursday, March 16, 12:00pm, POST318B (ICSpace)

Subquadratic Algorithms for Algebraic Generations of 3SUM

John Iacono
Professor, Computer Science and Engineering
NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering

Abstract:

The 3SUM problem asks if an input n-set of real numbers contains a triple whose sum is zero. We consider the 3POL problem, a natural generalization of 3SUM where we replace the sum function by a constant-degree polynomial in three variables. The motivations are threefold. Raz, Sharir, and de Zeeuw gave a O(n11/6) upper bound on the number of solutions of trivariate polynomial equations when the solutions are taken from the Cartesian product of three n-sets of real numbers. We give algorithms for the corresponding problem of counting such solutions. Grønlund and Pettie recently designed subquadratic algorithms for 3SUM. We generalize their results to 3POL. Finally, we shed light on the General Position Testing (GPT) problem: “Given n points in the plane, do three of them lie on a line?”, a key problem in computational geometry.
We prove that there exist bounded-degree algebraic decision trees of depth O(n12/7+ε) that solve 3POL, and that 3POL can be solved in O(n2(log log n)3/2/(log n)1/2) time in the real-RAM model. Among the possible applications of those results, we show how to solve GPT in subquadratic time when the input points lie on o((log n)1/6/(log log n)1/2) constant-degree polynomial curves. This constitutes a first step towards closing the major open question of whether GPT can be solved in subquadratic time.

To obtain these results, we generalize important tools — such as batch range searching and dominance reporting — to a polynomial setting. We expect these new tools to be useful in other applications.

Full article: Luis Barba, Jean Cardinal, John Iacono, Stefan Langerman, Aurélien Ooms, Noam Solomon: Subquadratic Algorithms for Algebraic Generalizations of 3SUM. CoRR abs/1612.02384 (2016)

 

ICS Students Win Big at AT&T Hackathon

ICS students and alumni swept almost all categories, including the Grand Prize, at the 2017 UH-AT&T Hackathon.

Grand Prize – Overall, Entertainment/Gaming 1st Place
Clay Nakamura (ICS) for DJ Reddit, a stuffed animal outfitted with a Raspberry PI and small speakers. DJ Reddit uses the Reddit API to download and play newly posted songs from /r/listentothis.

Entertainment/Gaming 2nd Place
Tony Gaskell (ICS Alumnus), Brandon Bards, Joelle Torneros, Sean Nakamura, and Joseph Carlson for Gapcha. 

Best Use of M2X, Best IoT 1st Place
Terry Palomares (ICS), Jonathan Robello (ICS), Brian Mayeshiro (ICS), Austin Haruki (ICS Alumnus) and Torsten Vaivai-Soderberg for Demeter, a Raspberry PI outfitted with humidity, temperature, and light sensors. A corresponding app gamifies gardening by awarding badges and achievements for providing appropriate sunlight and water.

Best IoT 2nd Place
Davis McKay for Maka’ala

Most Technical
Andrew Yamamoto (ICS), Aisis Chen, and Bradford Baris for Multipass

UI/UX
Il Ung Jeong (ICS) and Gina Watanabe for Village, a localized, micro-task application that enables users to create and view tasks in the neighborhood that will make a direct difference to their community.

Interested in participating next year? Here’s some thoughts from the winners:

  • I firmly believe that knowledge gained from experiences like the Hackathon will out-value any short-term monetary gain. (Brian Mayeshiro)
  • I highly recommend you attend the event regardless of your skill level. Focus on building up a skill or a personal project that school has prevented you from doing. (Clay Nakamura)
  • My favorite part of the Hackathon was not having to worry about my part-time job or my homework and just immersing myself in coding. (Il Ung Jeong)
  • I learned that you can accomplish a lot within 24 hours. (Jonathan Robello)
  • Definitely be ambitious, even if it means you have to stay up for the full 24 hours and be driven by coffee and energy drinks. (Terry Palomares)

Judges were State Senator Glenn Wakai, Chair of the Senate committee overseeing technology, Mark Wong, CIO of the City and County of Honolulu, Garret Yoshimi, UH CIO and VP for Information Technology, and Mark Quezada, CTO of local tech startup Hobnob. Congratulations to all!

Scott Robertson Appears on ThinkTech Hawaii

Professor Scott Robertson appeared on ThinkTech Hawaii on March 8th. He talked with host Jay Fidel about human-computer interaction, computer science, and social media and civic engagement.

Watch:

HI-Vision : Hawaiʻi Workshop on Establishing Trans-Pacific Visualization Research & Education Collaboration Networks

On Feb 6-7, 2017, HI-Vision (Hawaiʻi Workshop on Establishing Trans-Pacific Visualization Research & Education Collaboration Networks) was held at the Laboratory for Advanced Visualization and Applications at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. This workshop was co-organized by Jason Leigh of the University of Hawaii, Fang Pang Lin of the National Center for High Performance Computing, NARL, Shinji Shimojo of Osaka University, and Bill Chang – formerly of National Science Foundation.

28 Researchers from Hawaii, Taiwan and Japan were invited to brainstorm on new applications of visualizations using large scale display walls in the areas of Renewable Energy, Coral Ecology, Water Resource Management, Disaster Response, and the Creative Arts and Culture- all issues that are of major importance to island nations in the Pacific Rim such as Hawaii, Taiwan and Japan.


 

 

 

 

ACM Student Chapter Sponsors Teresa Nededog for Wetware Wednesday

The UH Manoa Student Chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) is sponsoring February’s WetWare Wednesday! This is a group that is all about problem solving with any kind of tech under the sun. Come early to hear Teresa Nededog and her experience as a software developer.

ACM will also be demonstrating awesome projects (Arduino, Vive, 3D Printing)!

When: Wednesday, February 22, 2017, 5pm
Where: UH Manoa iLab Building 37
Cost: FREE

Free Appetizers and refreshments
Parking available on campus

WetWare Wednesday is a networking event targeting local software developers and system engineers, students and faculty.

AT&T Mobile App Hackathon 2017 — Hawaii

March 10-11, 2017

Mobile App Hackathon, an event produced by the AT&T Developer Program, is designed for attendees interested in coding mobile apps or hacking hardware solutions. Expand your network and industry knowledge while implementing innovative ideas.

Prizes range from $500-$2500.

“So join us as we hack hardware, build apps/mobile apps, get fed, compete for prizes across different categories and most importantly: meet new people and scout for teammates to work on new or current projects. We will have experts from AT&T and the local community onsite to assist with your development.”

For details and registration: http://atthackhawaii.eventbrite.com