Nadiya Straton – ICS Seminar, Thursday, June 22, POST 302

Thursday, June 22, 1:00pm, POST 302

Comparative Methods Study on Predicting User Engagement with Health Care Content on Social Media

Nadiya Straton
Department of IT Management
Copenhagen Business School

Abstract:

Facebook “post popularity” analysis is fundamental for differentiating between relevant posts and posts with low user engagement. This research study aims at health and care organizations to improve information dissemination on social media platforms. At the same time, it will help users navigate through vast amounts of information in direction of the relevant health and care content and resort to preventive measures, where possible. Furthermore, the study explores prediction of popularity of healthcare posts on the largest social media platform: Facebook. Methodology is presented in this paper to predict user engagement based on eleven characteristics of the post: Post Type, Hour Span, Facebook Wall Category, Level, Country, isHoliday, Season, Created Year, Month, Day of the Week, Time of the Day. Finally, post performance prediction is conducted using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), Deep Neural Networks (DNN) and K-nearest neighbors (KNN). Different network topology is used to achieve best accuracy prediction followed by examples and discussion on why DNN might not be optimal technique for the given data set.

More information on the project.

LAVA Erupts at the Mālama Honua Summit

In celebration of Hōkūleʻa’s Homecoming after voyaging around Island Earth, the Polynesian Voyaging Society invited local and global community members to gather for a three-day summit to discuss mālama honua stories of hope inspired by the Worldwide Voyage and develop sail plans for the future of Hawaiʻi and our planet.

Academy for Creative Media students (Kari Noe, Andrew Guagliardo, Kurt Noe), ICS student (Anna Sikkink), and Learning Technology students (Patrick Karjala, Dean Lodes) celebrated the event by exhibiting Kilo Hoku Virtual Reality Voyaging Canoe Simulator.

Kilo Hoku is a project to explore the possibility of teaching future generations of students in the art and science of polynesian way finding using VR technology. The simulation puts the user on-board a virtual Hokulea twin-hull polynesian voyaging canoe and teaches them how to navigate between two nearby islands in Hawaii. The work was developed by ACM, ICS double major Kari Noe, ICS student Anna Sikkink, Learning Technology students Patrick Karjala and Dean Lodes.

The students not only demonstrated their simulator to the general public but also to Hokuleʻa navigators, as well as her captain, Kalepa Baybayan.

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LAVA Celebrates 40th Anniversary of Star Wars

How would a visualization laboratory celebrate Star Wars?

With the highest resolution Star Wars simulation in the world of course!

Graduate EE student Noel Kawano and undergraduate ICS student Ryan Theriot developed a simulation of the epic space battle in Star Wars Rogue One, and a scene on the desert planet of Tatooine.

The simulation was developed for the Destiny-class CyberCANOE at the Laboratory for Advanced Visualization & Applications. The CyberCANOE was co-funded by the National Science Foundation and the Academy for Creative Media System.

Official press story from KHON here.

LAVA exhibits at the Cultural Animation Film Festival 2017

Academy for Creative Media students (Kari Noe, Andrew Guagliardo, Kurt Noe), ICS student (Anna Sikkink), and Learning Technology students (Patrick Karjala, Dean Lodes) demonstrated two virtual reality projects (Kilo Hoku and How Maui Snared the Sun) at the 2017 Cultural Animation Film Festival at the Honolulu Museum of Art

Kilo Hoku is a project to explore the possibility of teaching future generations of students in the art and science of polynesian way finding using VR technology. The simulation puts the user on-board a virtual Hokulea twin-hull polynesian voyaging canoe and teaches them how to navigate between two nearby islands in Hawaii. The work was developed by ACM, ICS double major Kari Noe, ICS student Anna Sikkink, Learning Technology students Patrick Karjala and Dean Lodes.

How Maui Snared the Sun is a VR telling of the well known Polynesian myth of how Maui slowed down the sun in order to give the world more daylight. The work was developed by double ICS and ACM major Andrew Guagliardo, and ICS
major Anna Sikkink.

The projects were created as part of the ICS department’s Virtual and Augmented Reality course taught by Professor Jason Leigh, Director of the Laboratory for Advanced Visualization and Applications (LAVA). Hardware and software for the show was co-sponsored by LAVA, the Academy for Creative Media System, and University of Hawaii’s Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program.

 

March for Science Hawaii Set for April 22

The Information and Computer Sciences Department is a proud endorser of the March for Science in Hawaii.

The nationwide March for Science is the first step of a global movement to defend the vital role science plays in our health, safety, economies, and governments. Marches will take place in cities across the country on Earth Day, April 22, 2017.

The Honolulu event will start at 3 p.m. at the UH Manoa campus. There will be speakers, entertainment and activities before the March. The march will commence at 4 p.m. from Dole and University Streets.

More information:

There is no Planet B.

Professor Philip Johnson Talks about the March for Science on ThinkTech Hawaii

Professor Philip Johnson appeared with colleagues Dr. Joe Mobley and Dr. Helen Spafford on ThinkTech Hawaii to discuss the March for Science. The March for Science will take place on Saturday, April 22, 2017 from 3-7pm at the University of Hawaii, Manoa campus.

Kari Noe Demonstrates Virtual Reality at Math Day in Molokaʻi

Molokaʻi Math Day took place on April 8, 2017 in conjunction with the Hoʻomau festival at Lanikeha, Hoolehua on Molokaʻi. Molokaʻi Math Day was initiated in 2011 by the department of Mathematics and has become a yearly event since then. On April 8th, two UH faculty, two post-doctoral researchers, three graduate students and seven undergraduate students flew to Molokaʻi to run activities including robotics, toothpick geometry, origami 3D-shapes and probability games.

This year, Kari Noe of the Laboratory for Advanced Visualization and Applications participated with a portable VR station displayed for the first time, it proved to be a resounding success among Molokaʻi’s population with students lining up to dive into their first encounter with the world of virtual reality.

Kari is an undergraduate double major in Information & Computer Science and Academy for Creative Media (ACM). Kari also works as a laboratory research assistant in LAVA funded by ACM System.

Dr. Kim Binsted Talks Mars at The President’s Series on Hawai‘i Island

What Will It Be Like to Live on Mars?
Planning for Human Exploration of Space

On April 5, ICS Professor Kim Binsted will discuss the HI-SEAS (Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) project as part of The President’s Series on Hawai‘i Island.

 

HI-SEAS is an analog habitat for human spaceflight to Mars, located on an isolated Mars-like site on the Mauna Loa side of the saddle area at 8200 feet above sea level. The fourth phase of the project began in August of 2015 and lasted for one year. Learn what was discovered about what humans will need to stay happy and healthy during an extended mission to Mars.

Wednesday, April 5, 5 p.m.
RSVP by March 30
808-956-9340 or events@uhfoundation.org

Location
Hawaiʻi Community College – Pālamanui Outdoor Theatre (Campus Piko)
73-4225 Ane Keohokālole Hwy, Kailua-Kona

More information: The President’s Series – Hawai‘i Island

 

Professor David Chin on Bytemarks Cafe

Professor and Department Chair, David Chin, discussed AI and the Future of Work on the January 11 edition of Bytemarks Cafe. Check it out here: Episode 437.