As part of University of Hawai‘i Online, we offer aspects of our Masters of Science degree online. The information given on our M.S. Program web pages applies to ALN students as well. Please see those pages for information on applying, degree requirements, etc. This page provides additional information relevant to online students.

Please note: in the years leading up to 2014 (when this is being written), on-line course offerings have been decreasing.  As a result, it has become challenging for on-line students to find courses each semester that fulfill their expectations. While hoping that the situation improves in upcoming years, for the time being our on-line program is better suited to those students who can attend face-to-face courses some semesters (typically 2 or more semesters).

The MS  program is well suited to online learning due to its flexibility. There are no prerequisites between our MS-level courses. The only prerequisites pertain to your undergraduate level training in computer science. Deficiencies in your undergraduate training may be removed via our Online Undergraduate Courses. Once you have removed any deficiciencies you need not worry about the order in which you take our MS courses. We are working towards offering two regular MS courses each fall and spring term, and supporting directed reading and thesis projects in the summers.

Every student’s situation will be different: prospective students should contact ICS to design a plan suited for their needs. To illustrate one possible course of study, a student who is able to take only one course at a time can finish in slightly less than three years, including summers, through the following schedule:

 

Year Semester Type of Course Credits
First Fall Regular 3
Spring Regular 3
Summer 1 Directed Reading 3
Summer 2 Directed Reading 3
Second Fall Regular 3
Spring Regular 3
Summer 1 Thesis Project 2
Summer 2 Thesis Project 2
Third Fall Regular 3
Thesis Project 1
Spring Regular 3
Thesis Project 1
ICS 690 Seminar 1
Total 31

(The university requires that thesis credits be taken in the last semesters of study: hence the split-off of one credit into these terms.)